Measles Outbreak

Measles Outbreak

Current Case Count: 7

What is Measles:

Measles is a highly contagious, vaccine-preventable viral infection that starts with a high fever, runny nose, cough and red eyes, followed a few days later by a rash that starts on the head and gradually moves down the body. The rash illness lasts about a week. It is usually a relatively mild illness but can result in complications, including pneumonia or inflammation of the brain, that require hospitalization. 

People who contract the measles virus can spread the infection for four days before developing a rash and for four days after the rash starts. Measles can spread easily through the air to people who are not vaccinated or who have not had measles illness before.

MMR Vaccine Information:

For measles vaccinations, please do NOT go to a hospital emergency room. Either go to your health care provider or one of the Shelby County Health Department Clinics listed below.

For Vaccines at Shelby County Health Department Clinics:

Please remember to bring your insurance information. Pricing for vaccine varies from $0 to $20 based on your insurance and income status. 

Locations for Shelby County Health Department Clinics:

Cawthon Clinic
1000 Haynes
Memphis, TN 38114
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Hours: Monday - Friday 8:00 am - 4:30 pm
Collierville Clinic
167 Washington St.
Memphis, TN 38017
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Hours: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:00 am - 4:30 pm
Galloway Clinic
477 N. Manassas
Memphis, TN 38103
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Hours: Monday - Friday, 8:00 am - 4:30 pm
Hickory Hill Clinic
6590 Kirby Center Cove
Memphis, TN 38115
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Hours: Monday - Friday, 8:00 am - 4:30 pm; 2nd and 4th Saturdays, 8:00 am - 12:00 noon
Immunization Clinic
814 Jefferson
Room 216
Memphis, TN 38105
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Hours: Monday - Friday, 8:00 am - 4:30 pm
Millington Clinic
8225 Highway 51 N.
Memphis, TN 38053
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Hours: Monday - Friday, 8:00 am - 4:30 pm
Shelby Crossing Clinic 
6170 Macon Rd.
Memphis, TN 38134
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Hours: Monday - Friday, 8:00 am - 4:30 pm
Southland Mall Clinic 
1287 Southland Mall
Memphis, TN 38116
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Hours: Monday - Friday, 9:00 am - 5:00 pm;

2nd and 4th Mondays 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm;

2nd and 4th Saturdays, 9:00 am - 1:00 pm


For additional information on measles or information on your individual case:

Please call our MEASLES HOTLINE @ 901-222-9299.

Follow us on Twitter and Facebook! @ShelbyTNHealth

 


Location Notice for Potential Measles Exposures:

The investigation of the measles outbreak in Shelby County has identified the following locations as sites visited by people with measles during the time when they were infected with measles and could have spread the illness to others.

You may have been exposed to a person with measles if you were at the following locations on the dates listed. We are telling everyone who may have been exposed because measles spreads very easily from person to person.

If this applies to you, you do not need to go to the hospital or emergency room. Please follow these steps if you were at any of the listed locations during the times on the list:

1)  Check your immunization status to learn if you have been vaccinated against measles. Evidence of immunity from measles includes:

 

·         Written documentation of at least one dose of vaccine; or

·         laboratory evidence of immunity; or

·         laboratory confirmation that you have had measles; or

·         being born before 1957

People who work in healthcare facilities have even higher standards of immunity:  they are required to have two doses of MMR vaccine or laboratory evidence (a blood test) to prove immunity.

If you aren’t sure whether you or your child is immune to measles, please contact your health care provider. If you cannot find your immunization records, consider asking your health care provider, asking your parents if they have your records, or looking at school admission records for your proof of immunization. If you cannot find your health records, contact your healthcare provider about getting a dose of MMR vaccine. It is safe and effective, even if you have been vaccinated before.

      2)  Anyone who is not immune to measles can become sick if exposed to measles. Children are recommended to receive two doses of vaccine, with the first dose after their first birthday and the second dose routinely at age 4-6 years, before they start school.

 

      3)  Measles causes a rash all over the body and a high fever. People first develop a fever, then may have a cough, runny nose and watery eyes, followed by the rash that starts on their head and moves down the body. People with measles can spread the infection to others before they have a rash. People could get sick up to 21 days after they were exposed to measles. If you have a rash with fever within 21 days of when you might have been exposed to measles, tell your health care provider right away.

 

      4)  If you need medical care, call your doctor’s office or hospital before you go. Explain that you may have measles so the office or hospital can make sure other patients are not exposed when you arrive. As soon as you arrive at the doctor’s office, hospital or emergency room, tell someone who works there that you might have measles.

 

5)  If you have been exposed to measles, call your doctor right away if any of these applies to you:

•You are pregnant and not immune to measles.

•You have an infant under age one who was exposed.

•You have a child who only received one dose of measles vaccine (the MMR) who was exposed.

•Your immune system is compromised for other health reasons.

 

      6)  Be alert for any symptoms of measles, which may include fever and a cough, runny nose and red

      eyes. When a person is infected with measles, a rash of tiny red spots breaks out a few days after the

      fever, starting at the head and spreading to the rest of the body. This rash can last for a week; the

      cough can last for several days more. If you develop these symptoms, please call your health care

      provider before going to the office for evaluation. Do not go to the hospital or emergency room unless

      you or your child need urgent medical care. 

 

People could get sick up to 21 days after they were exposed to measles. If you have a rash with fever within 21 days of when you might have been exposed to measles, tell your health care provider right away.

The Shelby County Health Department has set up a hotline to answer your questions about measles. The number is 901-222-9299. Calls are answered live from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Central time. Callers at other times may leave a message with their phone number and will get a call back from a health department staff member.


Frequently Asked Questions

What is measles?

Measles is a highly contagious, vaccine-preventable viral infection.

How does measles spread?

Measles can spread to others through coughing and sneezing. It can live for up to two hours in an airspace where the infected person coughed or sneezed. If other people breathe the contaminated air or touch the infected surface, then touch their eyes, noses, or mouths, they can become infected.

Why is this considered an outbreak? Why is this important?

Measles is HIGHLY contagious. It usually a relatively mild illness but can result in complications, including pneumonia or inflammation of the brain, that require hospitalization. In rare cases, measles can result in death.

What is an outbreak?

An outbreak is the occurrence of cases of disease in excess of what would normally be expected in a defined community, geographical area or season. (http://www.who.int/topics/disease_outbreaks/en/)

Why is 6 cases considered an outbreak?

Six confirmed cases in Shelby County, TN is NOT a normal occurrence. In the ENTIRE state of Tennessee, there were only nine (9) confirmed cases in the last 12 YEARS (2004-2016). As of April 25, 2016, Shelby County, TN has 6 confirmed cases of measles and expects this number to rise in the last few DAYS.

Symptoms

You may have measles if you have been in contact with someone with measles and begin to experience the following signs:

o   high fever

o   runny nose

o   cough and red eyes

o   followed a few days later by a rash that starts on the head and gradually moves down the body

Am I at risk?

·         If you show signs and symptoms of measles and you were in contact with a person who contracted measles, then you may be at risk. Do NOT go to the hospital or emergency room. Please contact your health care provider or call the Measles Hotline @ 901.222.9299.

Get vaccinated/ Make sure your vaccine is up-to-date

Getting a MMR vaccine will help prevent measles, mumps, and rubella.

Is my vaccine shot up-to-date?

The vaccine schedule is as follows:

1st dose: 12- 15 months old

2nd dose: 4-6 years

Anyone born BEFORE 1992, check with your health care provider to see if you received the 2nd dose. If you did not receive the 2nd dose, you will need the 2nd MMR dose. You can receive this vaccine at your health care provider or public health clinic.

Anyone born BEFORE 1957 who did NOT have measles may also need a MMR vaccine.

Who should get vaccinated?

People who should get vaccinated are as follows:

o   Those who have been exposed to individuals with measles and vaccine is not up to date

o   Children should get 2 doses of MMR vaccine:

§  First Dose: 12–15 months of age

§  Second Dose: 4–6 years of age (may be given earlier, if at least 28 days after the 1st dose)

o   Some infants younger than 12 months should get a dose of MMR if they are traveling out of the country. (This dose will not count toward their routine series.)

o   Some adults should also get MMR vaccine:

§  Generally, anyone 18 years of age or older who was born after 1957 should get at least one dose of MMR vaccine, unless they can show that they have either been vaccinated or had all three diseases.

Who should NOT get vaccinated?

-          Anyone who has ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to the antibiotic neomycin, or any other component of MMR vaccine, should not get the vaccine.

-          Anyone who had a life-threatening allergic reaction to a previous dose of MMR or MMRV vaccine should not get another dose.

-          Some people who are sick at the time the shot is scheduled may be advised to wait until they recover before getting MMR vaccine.

-          Pregnant women should not get MMR vaccine.

o   Women should avoid getting pregnant for 4 weeks after vaccination with MMR vaccine.

-          Any of these may be a reason to not get the vaccine, or delay vaccination until later. Tell your doctor if the person getting the vaccine has any of the following:

o   Has any severe allergies.

o   Has HIV/AIDS, or another disease that affects the immune system

o   Is being treated with drugs that affect the immune system, such as steroids  

o   Has any kind of cancer  

o   Is being treated for cancer with radiation or drugs

o   Has ever had a low platelet count (a blood disorder)

o   Has gotten another vaccine within the past 4 weeks

o   Has recently had a transfusion or received other blood products

Where should I go to get vaccinated? / Clinic info

Scroll up on this tab to Locations for Shelby County Health Department Clinics.

If I and/or my child cannot get vaccinated due to a disease that affects the immune system or my child is not old enough or any other reason, what can I do to protect myself and/or my family?

-          Avoid contact with those you know who HAVE measles

-          Practice good hygiene: WASH YOUR HANDS

-          Use discretion for you and your family

-          Call your healthcare provider for additional tips

Is vaccine safe?

The MMR vaccine is very safe, and it is effective at preventing measles, mumps, and rubella. Vaccines, like any medicine, can have side effects. Most people who get MMR vaccine do not have any serious problems with it. Getting MMR vaccine is much safer than getting measles, mumps or rubella.

Common Side Effects of MMR Vaccine

·         Sore arm from the shot

·         Fever

·         Mild rash

·         Temporary pain and stiffness in the joints, mostly in teenage or adult women who did not already have immunity to the rubella component of the vaccine

 

Why cannot SCHD release vaccine status of those infected with measles?

To maintain patient privacy and confidentiality, the Shelby County Health Department does not release the vaccine status of those infected with measles. SCHD only provides information pertinent to protecting the health of the public.

Are the businesses, clinics, and other locations where infected individuals visited safe for me to visit?

On the schdresponse.com site, Shelby County Health Department has posted all locations in which an individual with measles visited. If you were present during the specified times listed, you may have been exposed to measles and should contact our hotline at 901.222.9299.

However, if you were NOT present at the times, then you do NOT have a risk for measles exposure.

The locations in which measles-infected individuals visited are NOW safe for you to return and patron.

I think I may have been in contact with an individual with measles. What should I do?

Monitor your symptoms. See if you have any signs for measles. Check to see if your vaccine is up to date. Contact your healthcare provider.

If I contracted measles years ago, can I get it again or do I need vaccine?

No, you are at very low risk to contract measles again and do not need the vaccine.     

I am breast feeding. Is it safe for me to receive the MMR vaccine?

Yes. Breast feeding does not interfere with the response to MMR vaccine, and your baby will not be affected by the vaccine through your breast milk.

My child is not yet old enough to receive vaccine. What can I do?

Breastfeed if you can. Most infants born in the United States will receive passive protection against measles, mumps, and rubella in the form of antibodies from their mothers.

I am a health provider/ clinic and need more information on protocol for vaccinating babies?

Call our hotline. 901.222.9299.

I got a call from the health department that I may have been exposed to measles. What are the next steps?

Call our hotline. 901.222.9299. Or the phone number left on your voicemail.

If I got a call that I may have been exposed to measles, should I contact those who had contact with me (family, friends, coworkers). Should they get vaccinated too?

No. However, please watch for signs and symptoms of measles. If you show signs and symptoms of measles, please do NOT go to the emergency. CONTACT YOUR HEALTH CARE PROVIDER.

Am an individual with a confirmed case of measles? What should I do?

If you HAVE measles:

1. Pease follow the advice of your healthcare provider.

2. Do NOT go to the hospital or emergency room to get treated but see your healthcare provider or call 901-222-9299. 

3. Stay indoors and AVOID PUBLIC PLACES!

4. AVOID contact with other people.
 
5. WASH Your Hands and practice good hygiene.
 
6. Cover your cough.
 
7. Ensure that your family and friends are immunized.
 

How can I help?

·         Get vaccinated

·         Make sure your vaccine is up to date

·         Wash your hands

·         Follow us on Facebook and Twitter @ShelbyTNHealth and share our posts and this FAQ to inform your family, friends, and neighbors

 

Hotline Number

Shelby County, TN Measles Hotline: 901.222.9299

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